SEAWAY SHIPPING was incorporated on 2004. Previously, we embarked into shipping industry as NVOCC freight forwarder, shipping agent and logistic provider.

About Us



Seaway Shipping (M) Sdn Bhd was established on 5th December 2004. As a renowned international NVOCC freight forwarder, we specialized in all aspect of international freight forwarding, logistic, linking worldwide with many counterparts and affiliates within the globe.

We able to source competitive sea freight charges, provide reliable services from shipping lines and most of all have regular interval with shortest time of arrival.

Being a NVOCC Freight Forwarder, we provide total logistics support for our valuable customers

  • Sea / Air / LCL Cargo Freight Forwarding
  • Custom Clearance
  • Marine Insurance
  • Warehousing
  • Haulage Services & Local Transport
  • Project Cargo Movement
  • Fumigation
  • Flexibag
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Our Services


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Business Logistics

 

Business logistics is a relatively new field in the study of business decision making, when compared with the traditional fields of study such as operations management, marketing, finance, human resources management.

Although businesses have been involved always with the activities that are now the domain of “business logistics” the benefits of coordination of logistics activities in business and the need to train the managers in managing a coordinated business logistics set up in their own firm gave an impetus to the separate study.

One definition of business logistics speaks of “having the right item in the right quantity at the right time at the right place for the right price in the right condition to the right customer


Revolution of Business Logistics

a) Poist Classification of Development of Logistics

Poist, R.F. [1986] sees three eras in the development of the subject and practice of logistics.
In each of the eras the emphasis of application and study of logistics systems has changed.

Poist: Classification of Development of Logistics
Era Time Period Emphasis
a. Pre – Logistics Pre-1950s Transportation
b. Logistics 1950s, 1960s, 1970s Logistics
c. Neo – Logistics 1980s and beyond Enterprise


b) Balou Classification

Ballou, R. H. [1985] gives another account of the genesis of the subject Business Logistics and different eras and approaches.
His classification is as follow:

Balou Classification
Era Time Period
a. Pre – 1950s Dormant years
b. 1950s – 1970 The development years
c. 1970s to present The takeoff years


c) Davis and Mandrodt Eras

Davis, F.W. Jr and Mandrodt, K.B., [1991] try to classify the business management historical eras:

Davis and Mandrodt Classification
Era Time Period
a. Production era Industrial revolution to end of 1800s
b. Distribution era Early 20th century to the end of World War II
c. Marketing era End of World War II to mid – 1970.
d. Quality era Mid – 1970s to end of 1980s.
e. Service era Present with de-industrialisation of the advanced Western economies.


Our coverage of Business Logistics Activities

i) Core Logistics Activities

a) Customer service standard

  • Determination of customer requirements for logistics service
  • Determination of customer response to service
  • Setting of customer service levels

b) Stock Management

  • Raw materials and finished goods inventory policies
  • Demand forecasting
  • Determination of whether to use stocks
    • Just – in – time policy determination
    • Type of stock management policy
      • Determination of products for different policies
      • Push or pull stocking strategies
      • Determination of policy on stocking points
c) Order policies

  • Sales order warehousing interface
  • Information processing for orders
  • Ordering rules

d) Transportation

  • Transportation service type selection
  • Mode selection
  • Freight consolidation
  • Carrier routing
  • Vehicle scheduling
ii) Support Logistics Activities

a) Warehousing

  • Determination of warehouse space requirement
  • Warehouse layout design
  • Configuration of warehouse operations
  • Stock placement

b) Purchasing

  • Supply source selection
  • Purchase timing
  • Purchasing Quantities

c) Information acquisition and maintenance

  • Collection, storage and manipulation of information
  • Data analysis
  • Control and audit procedures

d) Materials handling

  • Equipment selection
  • Equipment maintenance and replacement policies
  • Order picking operations
  • Storage systems and handling systems

e) Protection

  • Warehouse and transport security problems
  • Loss and damage protection in warehousing and transportation
  • Packaging for protection

f) Production scheduling

  • Specification aggregate production levels
  • Sequencing and timing in production

Cargo Tracking


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Sea Container Specification


DRY CARGO CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
Type Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
20 ft 24,000 2,370 21,630 5.898 2.352 2.394 33.200 2.343 2.280
40 ft 30,480 4,000 26,480 12.031 2.352 2.394 67.740 2.343 2.280

* CHARACTERISTICS
Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger Internal Cube.

 

REFRIGERATED CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
Refrigerated container Type Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.700 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.247 57.100 2.280 2.205

* CHARACTERISTICS
Recommended for delicate cargo. Bottom-air delivery system ensures refrigerated cargo reaches its destination in optimum condition.

 

OPEN TOP CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
OPEN TOP CONTAINERS Type Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
20 ft 24,000 2,580 21,420 5.629 2.212 2.311 32.000 2.330 2.263
40 ft 30,480 4,290 26,190 11.763 2.212 2.311 65.400 2.330 2.263

* CHARACTERISTICS
Allowing cargo to be loaded from the top, open top containers are particularly suitable for bulky cargo such as machinery. They are fitted with a PVC tarpaulin cover and attachable bows with cable sealing devices. The container doors can be removed to make the stuffing of cargo more convenient. Manufactured from steel.

 

FLAT RACK CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
flatrack_container Type Container Weight Interior Measurement
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
20 ft 30,480 2,900 27,580 5.624 2.236 2.234 27.900
40 ft 34,000 5,870 28,130 11.786 2.236 1.968 51.900

* CHARACTERISTICS
Flatracks are especially suited to heavy loads or cargo that needs loading from the top or sides, such as pipes and machinery. There are collapsible and non-collapsible containers with or without walls. Manufactured from steel.

 

GARMENT CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
GARMENT CONTAINERS Type Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
20 ft 24,000 2,240 21,760 5.898 2.352 2.394 33.200 2.343 2.280
40 ft 30,480 3,885 26,595 12.031 2.352 2.394 67.740 2.343 2.280

* CHARACTERISTICS
Use for all kinds of garment. The containers are specially designed for garment product and related industry.
There are some options of using a string or bar system or a combination of both. The containers allow increased flexibility, greater load Internal Capacity and savings on transportation and handling cost.

 

HIGH CUBE CONTAINERS DIMENSIONS
40-foot-high-cube-container Type Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Gross
(kg)
Tare
(kg)
Net
(kg)
Length
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
Capacity
(m)
Width
(m)
Height
(m)
40 ft 30,480 3,980 26,500 12.031 2.352 2.698 76.300 2.340 2.585
45 ft 30,480 4,800 25,680 13.544 2.352 2.698 86.000 2.340 2.585

* CHARACTERISTICS
With high cube containers, you gain extra foot in height compared with general-purpose containers. Ideal for light, voluminous cargo or bulky cargo. These extra volume containers come in steel and aluminium.

 

Note: For reference only.

Incoterms 2016


Incoterms ® 2016 Rules
CHART OF RESPONSIBILITIES
Charges / Fees Any Transport Mode Sea / Inland Waterway Transport Any Transport Mode
EXW FCA FAS FOB CFR CIF CPT CIP DAT DAP DDP
Ex Works Free Carrier Free Alongside Ship Free on Board Cost & Freight Cost Insurance & Freight Carriage Paid To Carriage Insurance Paid To Delivered at Terminal Delivered at Place Delivered Duty Paid
Packaging Buyer or Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Loading Charges Buyer Seller* Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Delivery to Port / Place Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Export Duty & Taxes Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Origin Terminal Charges Buyer Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Loading on Carriage Buyer Buyer Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Carriage Charges Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Insurance Seller Seller
Destination Terminal Charges Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Seller Seller Seller Seller Seller
Delivery to Destination Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Seller Seller
Import Duty & Taxes Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Buyer Seller

* There are actually two FCA terms: FCA Seller’s premises where the seller is responsible only for loading the goods and not responsible for inland freight; and FCA Named Place (International Carrier) where the seller is responsible for Inland Freight.

** INCOTERM RULES ARE NOT LAW AND WILL NOT RESOLVE ALL PROBLEMS IN TRADE. ABOVE DEFINITIONS ARE TO BE USED AS A GUIDELINE ONLY.

 

EXW

“Ex works” means that the seller delivers when he places the goods at the disposal of the buyer at the seller’s premises or another named place (i.e. works, factory, warehouse, etc.) not cleared for export and not loaded on any collecting vehicle.

This term thus represents the minimum obligation for the seller, and the buyer has to bear all costs and risks involved in taking the goods from the seller’s premises.

However, if the parties wish the seller to be responsible for the loading of the goods on departure and to bear the risks and all the costs of such loading, this should be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale. This term should not be used when the buyer cannot carry out the export formalities directly or indirectly. In such circumstances, the FCA term should be used, provided the seller agrees that he will load at his cost and risk.

 

FCA

“Free Carrier” means that the seller delivers the goods, cleared for export, to the carrier nominated by the buyer at the named place. It should be noted that the chosen place of delivery has an impact on the obligations of loading and unloading the goods at that place. If delivery occurs at the seller’s premises, the seller is responsible for loading. If delivery occurs at any other place, the seller is not responsible for unloading.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport, including multimodal transport.

“Carrier” means any person who, in contract of carriage, undertakes to perform or to procure the performance of transport by rail, road, air, sea, inland waterway or by a combination of such modes.

If the buyer nominates a person other than a carrier to receive the goods, the seller is deemed to have fulfilled his obligation to deliver the goods when they are delivered to that person.

 

FAS

“Free Alongside Ship” means that the seller delivers when the goods are placed alongside the vessel at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks of loss of or damage to the goods from that moment.

The FAS term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

THIS IS A REVERSAL FROM PREVIOUS INCOTERMS VERSIONS WHICH REQUIRED THE BUYER TO ARRANGE FOR EXPORT CLEARANCE.

However, if the parties wish the buyer to clear the goods for export, this should be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale.

This term can be used only for sea or inland waterway transport.

 

FOB

“Free on Board” means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ship’s rail at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks of loss of or damage to the goods from that point.The FOB term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. This term can be used only for sea or inland waterway transport. If the parties do not intend to deliver the goods across the ship’s rail, the FCA term should be used.

 

CFR

“Cost and Freight” means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ship’s rail in the port of shipment.

The seller must pay the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the named port of destination BUT the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time of delivery, are transferred from the seller to the buyer.

The CFR term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

This term can be used only for sea and inland waterway transport. If the parties do not intend to deliver the goods across the ship’s rail, the CPT term should be used.

 

CIF

“Cost, Insurance and Freight” means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ship’s rail in the port of shipment.

The seller must pay the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the named port of destination BUT the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time of delivery, are transferred from the seller to the buyer. However, in CIF the seller also has to procure marine insurance against the buyer’s risk of loss of or damage to the goods during the carriage.

Consequently, the seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium. The buyer should note that under the CIF term the seller is required to obtain insurance only on minimum cover. Should the buyer wish to have the protection of greater cover, he would either need to agree as much expressly with the seller or to make his own extra insurance arrangements.

The CIF term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

This term can be used only for sea and inland waterway transport. If the parties do not intend to deliver the goods across the ship’s rail, the CIP term should be used.

 

CPT

“Carriage paid to …” means that the seller delivers the goods to the carrier nominated by him but the seller must in addition pay the cost of carriage necessary to bring the goods to the named destination.

This means that the buyer bears all risks and any other costs occurring after the goods have been so delivered.

“Carrier” means any person who, in a contract of carriage, undertakes to perform or to procure the performance of transport, by rail, road, air, sea, inland waterway or by a combination of such modes.

If subsequent carriers are used for the carriage to the agreed destination, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier.

The CPT term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport including multimodal transport.

 

CIP

“Carriage and Insurance paid to …” means that the seller delivers the goods to the carrier nominated by him, but the seller must in addition pay the cost of carriage necessary to bring the goods to the named destination. This means that the buyer bears all risks and any additional costs occurring after the goods have been so delivered. However, in CIP the seller also has to procure insurance against the buyer’s risknof loss of or damage to the goods during the carriage.

Consequently, the seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium.

The buyer should note that under the CIP term the seller is required to obtain insurance only on minimum cover. Should the buyer wish to have the protection of greater cover, he would either need to agree as much expressly with the seller or to make his own extra insurance arrangements.

“Carrier” means any person who, in a contract of carriage, undertakes to perform or to procure the performance if transport, by rail, road, air, sea, inland waterway or by a combination of such modes.

If subsequent carriers are used for the carriage to the agreed destination, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier.

The CIP term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport, including multimodal transport.

 

DAT

“Delivered at Terminal” means that the seller delivers when the goods, once unloaded from the arriving means of transport, are placed at the disposal of the buyer at a named terminal at the named port or place of destination. “Terminal” includes any place, whether covered or not, such as a quay,warehouse, container yard or road, rail of air cargo terminal. The seller bears all risks involved in bringing the goods to and unloading them at the terminal at the named port or place of destination.

 

DAP

“Delivered duty unpaid” means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer, not cleared for import, and not unloaded from any arriving means of transport at the named place of destination. The seller has to bear the costs and risks involved in bringing the goods thereto, other than, where applicable, any “duty” (which term includes the responsibility for and the risks of the carrying out of customs formalities, and the payment of formalities, customs duties, taxes and other charges) for import in the country of destination. Such “duty” has to be borne by the buyer as well as any costs and risks caused by his failure to clear the goods for import in time.

However, if the parties wish the seller to carry out customs formalities and bear the costs and risks resulting therefrom as well as some of the costs payable upon import of the goods, this should be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport but when delivery is to take place in the port of destination on board the vessel or the quay (wharf), the DES or DEQ terms should e used.

 

DDP

“Delivered duty paid” means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer, cleared for import, and not unloaded from any arriving means of transport at the named place of destination. The seller has to bear all the costs and risks involved in bringing the goods thereto including, where applicable, any “duty” (which term includes the responsibility for and the risk of the carrying out of customs formalities and the payment of formalities, customs duties, taxes and other charges) for import in the country of destination.

Whilst the EXW term represents the minimum obligation for the seller, DDP represents the maximum obligation.

This term should bot be used if the seller is unable directly or indirectly to obtain the import licence.

However, if the parties wish to exclude from the seller’s obligations some of the costs payable upon import of the goods (such as value-added tax: VAT), this should be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale.

If the parties wish the buyer to bear all risks and costs of the import, the DDU term should be used.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport but when delivery is to take place in the port of destination on board the vessel or on the quay (wharf), the DES or DEQ terms should be used.

Contact Us


SEAWAY SHIPPING (M) SDN BHD

69-02, JalanMolek 3/1 ,
Taman Molek,
81100, Johor Bahru,
Johor, Malaysia

Tel            : +607 353 0772
Fax           : +607 355 0771

Email       : Sales@seawayshipping.com.my


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cargo-container